Cricket

Match Winner (Including Super Over)

"Match Winner" in cricket refers to betting on the outcome of a cricket match, including any Super Over. The bettor is asked to predict whether Team 1 (W1) or Team 2 (W2) will win the match.
If you place a bet on Team A to be the Match Winner, you'll win the bet if Team A wins the match. Conversely, if you place the bet on Team B, you'll win if Team B wins the match.

Double Chance

"Double Chance" bet is a type of wager that allows you to bet on two out of the three possible outcomes in a match. It's called "double chance" because you're getting two chances to win your bet.
There are three potential outcomes in a cricket match: Team A wins, Team B wins, or the match ends in a draw. A double chance bet allows you to cover two of these outcomes with a single bet. Here are the double chance bet options:
  1. 1.
    Team A wins or Draw: You win the bet if Team A wins or if the match ends in a draw.
  2. 2.
    Team B wins or Draw: You win the bet if Team B wins or if the match ends in a draw.
  3. 3.
    Team A wins or Team B wins: You win the bet if either Team A or Team B wins. This is a good option in formats where a draw is unlikely, such as in One Day Internationals (ODIs) or Twenty20 matches.

Draw No Bet

"Draw No Bet" is a type of wager in cricket betting where you bet on either Team A or Team B to win the match, but if the match ends in a draw, your stake is returned - meaning you neither win nor lose.
Here's how it works:
  1. 1.
    If you place a "Draw No Bet" on Team A and Team A wins the match, you win the bet.
  2. 2.
    If Team B wins, you lose the bet.
  3. 3.
    If the match ends in a draw, your stake is returned.
"Draw No Bet" is a safer betting option, especially in formats like Test cricket where draws can be a common outcome. It reduces the risk of losing your bet due to a draw. However, because the risk is lower, the potential payout for this type of bet is also usually lower than a standard match winner bet.

Top Batter

"Top Batter" is a type of wager where you bet on which player will score the most runs in a match, an innings, or during a specified part of the game. This bet can be placed for either team or both.
Here's how it works:
  1. 1.
    If you place a "Top Batter" bet on Player A and Player A scores the most runs for their team in the specified period, you win the bet.
  2. 2.
    If any other player scores the most runs, you lose the bet.
This type of bet adds an extra level of excitement to watching a cricket match as you have a specific player to root for, instead of just cheering for a team.

Top Bowler

"Top Bowler" is a type of wager where you bet on which player will take the most wickets in a match, an innings, or during a specified part of the game. This bet can be placed for either team or both.
Here's how it works:
  1. 1.
    If you place a "Top Bowler" bet on Player A and Player A takes the most wickets for their team in the specified period, you win the bet.
  2. 2.
    If any other player takes the most wickets, you lose the bet.
Like the "Top Batter" bet, the "Top Bowler" bet adds an extra level of excitement to watching a cricket match as you have a specific player to follow and root for.

Most Sixes

"Most Sixes" is a type of betting in cricket that allows bettors to wager on which team they believe will hit the most sixes during the match.
W1: You can bet that Team 1 will hit the most sixes. W2: You can bet that Team 2 will hit the most sixes. X: You can bet that both teams will hit an equal number of sixes. This type of bet adds an extra element of excitement to the game as it isn't always the team that wins the match that hits the most sixes.

Match Winner/Top Batter

"Match Winner/Top Batter" is a type of combination bet in cricket. In this bet, you wager on both the outcome of the match (i.e., which team will win) and which player will score the most runs (i.e., the top batter).
Here's how it works:
  1. 1.
    If you place a "Match Winner/Top Batter" bet on Team A and Player B, both conditions must occur for you to win the bet. Team A must win the match, and Player B must score the most runs out of all the players in the match.
  2. 2.
    If only one or neither condition occurs, you lose the bet. For example, if Team A wins the match but Player B is not the top batter, or if Player B is the top batter but Team A does not win the match, you lose the bet.
This type of bet can offer higher potential returns than a single bet because it requires two conditions to be met, which increases the risk. Knowledge of both the teams and individual players is crucial for this type of wager.

Total Sixes

"Total Sixes" is a type of bet in cricket where you wager on the total number of sixes that will be hit in a match. A six is scored when the batsman hits the ball over the boundary without it touching the ground, earning six runs.
The game sets a line for this total, and bettors can wager on whether they believe the actual number of sixes hit will be over or under this number.
For example, if the line is set at 15.5:
  • If you bet 'over' and 16 or more sixes are hit in the match, you win the bet.
  • If you bet 'under' and 15 or fewer sixes are hit, you win the bet.
This type of bet does not consider who wins the match. It is solely based on the total number of sixes hit by both teams during the match. Knowledge of the teams, players, pitch conditions, and match format can be beneficial when making this type of wager.

Total Fours

"Total Fours" is a type of bet in cricket where you wager on the total number of fours that will be hit in a match. A four is scored when the batsman hits the ball to the boundary of the field, with the ball touching the ground at least once, earning four runs.
The game sets a line for this total, and bettors can wager on whether they believe the actual number of fours hit will be over or under this number.
For example, if the line is set at 30.5:
  • If you bet 'over' and 31 or more fours are hit in the match, you win the bet.
  • If you bet 'under' and 30 or fewer fours are hit, you win the bet.
This type of bet does not consider who wins the match. It is solely based on the total number of fours hit by both teams during the match. Factors like the teams playing, the form of the batsmen, the pitch conditions, and the match format can influence the outcome of this bet.

Total Sixes

"Total Sixes" is a market type used in cricket where you bet on the total number of sixes that will be scored in a match. A six is the term used when a player hits the ball over the boundary without it bouncing, thus scoring six runs.
In this type of market, a line (number) is usually set by the bookmaker, and you as the bettor would predict whether the total number of sixes scored in the match will be over or under that line.
For example, if the line is set at 10.5:
  • If you bet 'over' and 11 or more sixes are scored in the match, you win the bet.
  • If you bet 'under' and 10 or fewer sixes are scored, you win the bet.
The prediction focuses solely on the total number of sixes scored in the match and not on the outcome of the match (i.e., which team wins). This prediction requires an understanding of the teams' strengths, players' abilities, and conditions of play.

Total Runs

"Total Runs" is a common type of prediction in cricket where you wager on the total number of runs that will be scored in a match, innings, or other specified period. This can apply to the total runs by a team or the total runs in the entire match by both teams combined.
The game sets a line for this total, and bettors can wager on whether they believe the actual number of runs scored will be over or under this number.
For example, if the line is set at 250.5 for a One Day International (ODI):
  • If you bet 'over' and 251 or more total runs are scored in the match, you win the bet.
  • If you bet 'under' and 250 or fewer total runs are scored, you win the bet.
This type of prediction does not consider who wins the match. It's purely based on the total number of runs scored. Factors that can influence this include the quality of the batting and bowling, the pitch conditions, and the weather.

Most Fours

"Most Fours" is a type of prediction in cricket where you wager on which team or player will hit the most fours in a match. A four is scored when the batsman hits the ball to the boundary, with the ball touching the ground at least once, thus earning four runs.
Here's how it works:
  1. 1.
    If you place a "Most Fours" prediction on Team A or Player B, and they hit more fours than any other team or player in the match, you win the prediction.
  2. 2.
    If any other team or player hits more fours, you lose the prediction.
This type of prediction doesn't consider who wins the match. It's only based on the total number of fours hit by the team or player. It's important to consider factors like the form of the batsmen, the conditions of the pitch, and the tactics of the teams when placing this kind of wager.

1st Inning Score

"1st Innings Score" is a type of prediction in cricket where you wager on the total number of runs that will be scored in the first innings of the match. This can apply to a specific team's first innings score or the combined score of both teams in their respective first innings.
The game sets a line for this total, and bettors can wager on whether they believe the actual number of runs scored in the first innings will be over or under this number.
For example, if the line is set at 300.5:
  • If you bet 'over' and 301 or more total runs are scored in the first innings, you win the bet.
  • If you bet 'under' and 300 or fewer total runs are scored in the first innings, you win the bet.
Factors to consider while placing such a prediction include the strength of the batting lineup, pitch conditions, weather conditions, and the team's historical performance in the first innings.

1st Ball of the Match

"First Ball of the Match" is a type of bet in cricket where you wager on what will happen on the very first ball of the match.
Several outcomes can be predict on, including:
  1. 1.
    Whether the first ball will be a dot ball (no runs scored off it).
  2. 2.
    Whether the batsman will score runs off the first ball, and if so, how many (one run, two runs, four runs, six runs, etc.).
  3. 3.
    Whether the first ball will result in a wicket.
  4. 4.
    Whether the first ball will be a wide, a no-ball, or a legal delivery.
The odds for each of these outcomes will depend on the specific players involved and the match conditions. The bowler's form and style, the batsman's approach, and the pitch and weather conditions are all factors to consider.